Winter may not be everyone’s favorite season. The cold and windy weather can make it hard to get—and stay—warm. Pause for a moment and consider this scene:

A woman stands a bus stop in Chicago wearing a heavy winter coat, a wool scarf and gloves. Her hood is pulled so tightly over her hat that only her eyes are visible. Even so, she is frozen to the bone. Her body trembles under her many layers, and her toes, which should be warm and snug in her doubled-up socks and thick boots, are slowly succumbing to the winter chill.

Not everyone lives in a climate with bitter winter weather. However, no matter where you live, there are ways to combat the cold weather. So, what’s the remedy for bone-chilling cold? Soup, of course! Think about the last time you went out to dinner. What was the first thing the waiter brought you? It was probably a round of ice waters. And what was your first course—possibly a salad?

Now think about that image of the shivering girl waiting at the bus stop. Would you have offered her ice water and a raw salad? Probably not. You would’ve likely given her something warming—like tea and chicken soup. That’s where TCM comes in.

No matter how cold (or warm) it is outside, our society looks for that cool, refreshing drink. Cold drinks and foods (including raw foods) carry a cold essence that upsets the smooth functioning of the Spleen and Stomach. A cold essence or energy slows the digestive process down, possibly leading to uncomfortable digestive disturbances. Warming foods, on the other hand, support the Spleen and Stomach and help all organ systems to run smoothly and more efficiently, like a well-oiled machine.

At this time of year, it’s best to eat foods that warm the body. Enjoy warm teas and soups throughout the day. We have a multitude of soup recipes on our website—some of which are truly simple to make, even after a long, hard day at work. If you master a few easy broths (vegetables boiled in water or water with mushroom seasoning) or use a packaged organic broth instead, your soup can be on the table in less than ten minutes. What a great way to warm up and feed your body what it needs during this time of winter rest and renewal.

 

Check out some new (and tried-and-true) soup recipes here.

 

Food, Nature, TCM

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