We use our senses to navigate life. Using our eyes to see, our hands to feel, our ears to hear, our noses to smell, our mouths to taste and our minds to think makes us highly developed individuals. However, there is so much more that is unseen. We can delve so much deeper than we often allow ourselves to go.

Imagine rappelling down a mountain. You have your rope tied to a rock at the top of the mountain. If you head straight down, that rope will support you until your feet safely touch the ground. But if you diverge a bit—go to the far right or the far left—you may encounter a beautiful vista that you would’ve missed if you had followed the given path. You may also experience trials and tribulations—sharp rocks or unsteady ground—that once you’ve crossed, make you a stronger climber.

You see, life is all about diverting from the chosen path. If we stick within what we know and can tangibly experience, we leave so much behind! Recall a recent experience. Did you take the quick path through the middle of the forest, or did you wind around the perimeter and enjoy the journey? We often choose the quick and narrow paths because our minds, lives, and calendars are so cluttered. But it is in meandering through these experiences that we find the greatest treasures.

So how do we go beyond? How can we see the unseen?

We start by dropping our minds. When we walk through life minds first, and focus on what is directly in front of us, we miss the beauty that surrounds us. We don’t take time to experience the small things—the ones that often bring the most joy. We fail to see the innate beauty in ourselves and in each other.

But when we walk through life eyes open, with our hearts out front, we learn to see, hear, feel, smell, taste and touch in a different way. We learn that the path in front of us is just a tiny piece of the puzzle. Our intuitive spirits begin to take over and we realize that we don’t need to always be in control. Walking this path takes an immense amount of faith. As the ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu once said, “When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.”

So give it a try. Let go. Drop your worries and your expectations. Let yourself be free so that you can become all that you are intended to be.

 

 

 

 

 

Mind, Body, Spirit, TCM

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